August 20, 2014

View & Comment…

Scholar

Share…



Myanmar’s Young Tourism Entrepreneurs

bbc.com | Article Link | by Kayleigh Long

Since almost five decades of rule by a military junta came to an end in Myanmar (also known as Burma) in 2011, a growing number of tourists are choosing to visit the South East Asian nation.

From ancient cities, to dazzling Buddhist temples, and unspoilt beaches and countryside, it is easy to see the attraction of the country to international visitors.

This year an estimated three million travellers will visit Myanmar, according to the government's Ministry of Hotels and Tourism.

This is a 50% rise on the two million who entered the country in 2013, and triple the one million who visited in 2012.

Read more...

Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons / Jean-Marie Hullot

View Comments in Scholar…

August 11, 2014

View & Comment…

Scholar

Share…



Remittances and Growth: Gone Missing

economist.com | Article Link | by S.H.

Can remittances help poor countries to grow rich? In many countries, the money received from workers who are toiling abroad represents a significant source of income. India received remittances last year that were almost three times as large as the inward investments made by foreign firms. In Tajikistan, as we have previously reported, migrant workers send home the equivalent of 47% of the country's GDP, and as many as half of the Tajik men in working-age are now believed to be living abroad. Similarly, an estimated 40% of Somalia’s population depend on remittances and need the cash to buy food and medicine. Remittances may be large but what are their effects on economic development? According to previous research, they are hard to detect.

Adolfo Barajas of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) finds with his co-authors in an IMF Working Paper that:

"decades of private income transfers—remittances—have contributed little to economic growth in remittance-receiving economies...the most persuasive evidence in support of this finding is the lack of a single example of a remittances success story: a country in which remittances-led growth contributed significantly to its development...no nation can credibly claim that remittances have funded or catalyzed significant economic development."

Remittances are set to exceed the half-trillion-dollar mark in the near future, according to a projection from the World Bank. The increase has been dramatic; in 1990 such flows amounted to $49 billion (in 2011 dollar terms). Why has such a rapid growth in remittances not led to any discernible growth in GDP? A recent paper by Michael Clemens of the Centre for Global Development and David McKenzie of the World Bank provides three possible answers.

Read more...

Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons / Faisal Akram

View Comments in Scholar…

July 8, 2014

Share…



Power and Participation in the Age of Big Data

From the Community

Power and Participation in the Age of Big Data

The Global Studies Conference is excited to announce Power and Participation in the Age of Big Data as the Special Focus of the 2015 conference to be held in London from 20-21 July 2015.

In The New Digital Age: Reshaping the Future of People, Nations and Business, Executive Chairman of Google Eric Schmidt and Director of Google Ideas Jared Cohen present a bold vision for the digital age. At the heart of their vision is the project of "full connectivity" (Schmidt 2013 p. 34). For Schmidt and Cohen, the project of "full connectivity" engenders the promise of more efficient markets, increased productivity, and useful tools for enlarged democratic action. Within this context, Schmidt and Cohen claim that the Internet is a historically specific social, political, and economic phenomenon. The Internet, they argue, "could ultimately be seen as the realization of the classic international relations theory of an anarchic, leaderless world" (Schmidt 2013 p. 83). The special focus of the 2015 Global Studies Conference centers on their claim and presents the following questions: how do we make sense of this "leaderless world?” What can the digital age and its communication technologies teach us about the future of order in global life?

The conference will address the above questions with an interdisciplinary approach, through keynote speakers, garden sessions, workshops and parallel sessions.

Visit the Call for Papers for more information.

June 26, 2014

View & Comment…

Scholar

Share…



Beijing to the US by train: China outlines plans to connect world by high speed rail network

independent.co.uk  | Article Link | by Tomas Jivanda

China has outlined its plan to connect the world by high-speed rail, including an underwater link to the US running a total 13,000km.

The ‘China to Russia plus the United States’ line proposed by the Chinese Academy of Engineering would start in the north east of China, travel up through Siberia, across the Bering Strait to Alaska and down through Canada before reaching the contiguous US, The Beijing Times reports.

Other planned lines - construction of which has reportedly began in China - are a link to London via Paris, Berlin and Moscow, along with a second route to Europe following the silk road to reach as far as Germany via Iran and Turkey. The international legs of the lines are currently under negotiation, the state ran paper said.

A fourth Pan-Asian line, connecting China with Singapore via Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand and Malaysia, is already under construction. Proposals for lines running from China to Africa are currently being drawn up, the paper added.

Read more...

Image courtesy of Magnus Manske / WikiMedia Commons

View Comments in Scholar…

June 10, 2014

View & Comment…

Scholar

Share…



Piketty’s Fair-Weather Friends

jacobinmag.com | Article Link | by Seth Ackerman

In a Jacobin essay last fall, Mike Beggs and I argued that the themes of inequality and social class — central issues to the classical economists who founded the discipline two centuries ago — have been forcing their way onto the agenda of mainstream economics inch by inch after a century of neoclassical neglect. But this Occupy-era development has left the field in an awkward place: its theories and methods, inherited from the class-averse neoclassical tradition, are badly adapted to its newfound subject — leaving economists to face the return of the social question woefully unprepared.

Then came the Piketty phenomenon, an unprecedented explosion of popular and scholarly discussion of the economics of inequality. And not just inequality as it appears in dry distribution tables. To a remarkable extent for a work of modern economics, Piketty’s book explores social class in all its rich historical dimensions.

It pierces the veil of income shares to observe the medieval peasants, civil servants, and coupon-clipping rentiers who populated them. It inquires into the differing types of property held by families of contrasting social stations — the penchant for real estate of the interwar French middle class, the imposing bulk of enslaved humans in the antebellum US capital stock, the surprisingly sophisticated securities portfolios of Belle Époque legatees. All this is a welcome reminder of an older style.

Read More...

View Comments in Scholar…

June 6, 2014

Share…



The Global Studies Journal, Volume 6, Issue 3 Now Available

Bookstore | Full Issue | Global Studies

We are pleased to announce the publication of The Global Studies Journal, Volume 6, Issue 3.

This issue is now available through our online bookstore. Participants of the 2013 conference and 2013-2014 Community Members may download full-text articles for free by logging in to CGPublisher.

This issue features the following articles...

Read More…

May 29, 2014

View & Comment…

Scholar

Share…



Tiananmen: How Wrong We Were

nybooks.com | Article Link | by Jonathan Mirsky

Twenty-five years ago to the day I write this, I watched and listened as thousands of Chinese citizens in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square dared to condemn their leaders. Some shouted “Premier Li Peng resign.” Even braver ones cried “Down with Deng Xiaoping and the Communist Party.” Before long, on the night of June 3–4, the People’s Liberation Army crashed into the square, rolling over the tents pitched there by industrial workers who had joined in the protests, and mowing down unarmed demonstrators. Until then, crowds in the square had walked wherever they pleased rather than standing on one of the numbered paving stones in that vast space. For decades, those who went there to see and hear national leaders were instructed to stand on a particular stone and shout prescribed slogans. But in May 1989, students and ordinary people were engaged in something the Communist Party has never been able to tolerate: zifade, “spontaneous” demonstrations.

That spontaneity spread from Inner Mongolia to Guangzhou. In Beijing, instead of the usual greeting between acquaintances, “Have you eaten yet?” people asked, “Have you demonstrated yet?” Police and soldiers had almost disappeared, and the staff of the Party’s newspapers appeared in the square holding high a banner bearing the words “We don’t want to lie anymore.” A few days before the killings, thousands of unarmed soldiers marched towards the square only to be scolded by elderly women and shamed into turning back.

Read more...

Photo courtesy of Daduzi / WikiMedia Commons

View Comments in Scholar…

May 1, 2014

Share…



The Postcapital Economy

http://thenewinquiry.com/ | Original Article | by Izabella Kaminska

For years, China’s country’s growing spare capacity and rising investment have worried outsiders like me about the sustainability ofits growth model. The idea that Chinese demand for resources—which were ultimately being used as much for manufacturing for the export market as domestic-based consumption—was indicative of a competitive and sustainable global bid for goods and output seemed to me unconvincing. Especially without evidence that any rebalancing from investment and export-driven growth to consumption-based growth was really happening.

Two things have since led me to adjust my opinion.

The first was an encounter with a Chinese fund manager in Geneva about two years ago. Ever mindful of not being brainwashed, I came prepared with what I considered an extremely convincing argument for the case against the Chinese investment case. But rather than have my case knocked down, the fund manager never hesitated to agree with every point. It was confusing.

Read more...

Image courtesy of WiNG / Wikimedia Commons

April 4, 2014

View & Comment…

Scholar

Share…



‘Deglobalization’ Is the Way to Reduce Inequality

huffingtonpost.com | Original Article | by Pablo Solon

The race of globalization is leaving the majority of the world's population far behind. According to Unicef, the richest 20 percent of the population gets 83 percent of global income, while the poorest quintile has just 1 percent. This trend is getting worse. A new UNDP report called "Humanity Divided" estimates that 75 percent of the population lives in societies where income distribution is less equal now than it was in the 1990s, although global GDP ballooned from $22 trillion to $72 trillion.

For developing economies in Asia, the Gini coefficient -- which measures income inequality on a scale from zero to one where one is worst -- rose from 0.33 in 1990 to 0.46 in 2010. Read More...

Image Courtesy of Emmanuel Saez (CC by SA 3.0)

View Comments in Scholar…

March 27, 2014

View & Comment…

Scholar

Share…



The Future of Europe: An Interview with George Soros

nybooks.com | Original Article | by George Soros and Gregor Peter Schmitz

Parts of the following interview with George Soros by the Spiegel correspondent Gregor Peter Schmitz appear in their book, The Tragedy of the European Union: Disintegration or Revival?, just published by PublicAffairs.

This interview will appear in the April 24, 2014 issue of The New York Review.

Gregor Peter Schmitz: The conflict in Crimea and Ukraine has changed the shape of European and world politics, and we will come to it. But let us first talk about a subject on which you’ve taken a critical position over the years: the crisis of the European Union: With regard to the euro, isn’t the worst over? Read More...

Image Courtesy of Aclackson (CC by SA 3.0)

 

View Comments in Scholar…

Page 1 of 9

Newer  | 

Search News